Nando Parrado at World Business Forum 2010 – Crisis Management and Living Life

Nando Parrado spoke at the World Business Forum 2010 about Effective leadership amidst chaos: The Miracle of the Andes. Fernando Parrado is one of the survivors of the airplane crash of Uruguayan Air Force Flight 571 in the Andes in 1972 – one of the greatest survival stories ever. After the accident, he helped publish the bestselling book Alive: The Story of the Andes Survivors. In 2006, he co-wrote the New York Times bestseller Miracle in the Andes: 72 Days on the Mountain and My Long Trek Home.

Please watch the short video to hear a brief summary by the speaker in his own words. His message was one of humility and perspective.

1.  Luck plays a role in our success.  I survived because I chose a seat in the plane in row 9.  Everyone behind this row was killed.

2.  No one knows how you will react in crisis until it happens.  We did things we could never have imagined to survive.  You cannot think like you are sitting here, you must put yourself in that spot with no food for days and slowly freezing. The search for us had been called off and we had no idea when or if we would be found.

3.  We learned what is important in life.  You never know what will happen so do the things that are important every day.  What is most important is the love you have in your life.  Life is measured by the extraordinary moments that take your life away and it is all rooted in love. Kiss your partner.  Maintain your connections with those you care about.  Make each moment count.  Be grateful.

It has been to spend almost 2 days listening to great business and political leaders talking about what they did to create professional success.  Now, near the end of the 2 days, we hear from an amazing individual who talked about what it is to be a person living in the moment rooted in what is really important to him, love.  His message calls me to stop and think about who I am beyond my contribution to my profession.  If I were to die, then be given a second chance at life, what would I do with that precious time?  Can I live my life that way now?

To become a more innovative leader, you can begin by taking our free leadership assessments and then enrolling in our online leadership development program.

Check out the companion interview and past episodes of Innovating Leadership, Co-creating Our Future, via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible,  iHeartRADIO, and NPR One.  Stay up-to-date on new shows airing by following the Innovative Leadership Institute LinkedIn.

AG Lafley at the World Business Forum – Becoming a Creative Culture

A.G. Lafley is the former Chairman of the Board, President and Chief Executive Officer of Procter & Gamble, the world’s largest consumer goods company.  He spoke at the World Business Forum about customer centric growth.

In response to the question, what would you recommend we do tomorrow when we go back to work, Mr. Lafley talked about the following components necessary as the foundation for a creative culture.  He recommended looking at how you are doing in each of the following areas:

1.  Openness.  Be open to new ideas and disruptive technologies.  There are innovations that will change many facets of our lives very quickly.  If we are not identifying them and bringing them to market, others will.  These changes may come from within our industry or others that impact us indirectly.  If the washing machine changes, detergent may change dramatically.  Is there something you should be more open to?

2.  Curiosity.   Get curious about something you would like to learn more about.  Depending on your role, you may want to learn more about items that directly impact your tasks.  As a leader, you may want to learn more about concepts like governance or social media that are changing very quickly and are changing how we lead and interact with our stakeholders.  What questions should you be asking?

3.  Connecting.  With the advent of technology, we are able to connect with colleagues and customers in ways not possible a few years ago.  Who do you want to connect to (a thought leader or mentor)?  Who would you like to connect to you (customers, employees)?  Do you want to be more accessible?

4.  Collaborating.  With companies subcontracting, outsourcing, and collaborating in ways never imagined a few years ago, what are you doing that you should shift to someone else?  When you shift the work, what have you made time to do more of?

5.  Courage.  Have the courage to make the tough decisions like introducing a disruptive technology or making a business decision that will create long term value for the company but frustrate some customers (like discontinuing a mediocre product line).  What one action can you take that you have put off because it just seems too daunting?  Is there a small experiment you can engage in that will seem less daunting?

While these qualities were not limited to leaders, these qualities are very similar to those discussed by other presenters at the forum.  Steven Levitt talked a great deal about the spirit of curiousity and acting like a scientist.  These qualities are very similar to those demonstrated by some of the worlds most successful scientists.

Where are you demonstrating these qualities in your work?

To become a more innovative leader, you can begin by taking our free leadership assessments and then enrolling in our online leadership development program.

Check out the companion interview and past episodes of Innovating Leadership, Co-creating Our Future, via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible,  iHeartRADIO, and NPR One.  Stay up-to-date on new shows airing by following the Innovative Leadership Institute LinkedIn.

Carlos Brito from World Business Forum 2010 The Power of “Dream, People, Culture”

Carlos Brito talked to the World Business Forum about – Building a Performance Culture.   Better than you: How to Building a Cohesive Team of High Achievers.  Carlos is the CEO of Anheuser-Busch InBev. During 5 mergers and acquisitions we continually asked: why is it that our performance is better than these other companies.  We found the “Dream People culture”.  This is not about theory – it is about practicing what we believe in.

1.  Dream – have a big dream, stretch and be credible.  Define big by we know 70-80% of how to get there.   Inspire, align and drive commitment.  Set the bar higher.  Anchor everything in the dream.

2.  People make companies great.

  • Great companies are formed by great people.
  • Great companies hire the best people,
  • Great people attract more of the same.  Poor performers attract more of the same.
  • Great people with the right training and opportunities get better and so do we when we work with them.
  • Great people like meritocracy – they want feedback so they can continue to improve.
  • As a leader you must be the coach – spend time with the people – this is everyone’s job!

3.  Culture of Ownership – owners make better decisions because it is their company and they are committed for the long term.   Need to worry about both short term and long term.  Long term thinkers do not take short cuts – it takes time and patience to succeed.

As the CEO, I talk about every time I meet with people.  This is what we are all about.  It is what brought us here to be at the top of our industry.  It is my job to make sure everyone knows this.

Brito’s discussion is consistent with those of Collins and Welsh.  While he talks about his experience through his own lens there are several commonalities:

  • Leaders build the organization by setting a vision
  • They invest in people through hiring, development and processes that give feedback to encourage employees to improve.   They put the right people in the right jobs.
  • They have processes to face brutal facts in their performance (using meritocracy – evaluating people and recognizing the best).
  • The use discipline and rigor in their daily business created by a culture of ownership.

As I listen to these speakers talk about their research and their experiences, I hear similar themes.  As our world changes, leadership is critical to business success and while we may use different words and models, there are very strong common themes coming from research and from experience.  What are you doing as a leader to evaluate personal and organizational leadership to ensure your success?

To become a more innovative leader, you can begin by taking our free leadership assessments and then enrolling in our online leadership development program.

Check out the companion interview and past episodes of Innovating Leadership, Co-creating Our Future, via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible,  iHeartRADIO, and NPR One.  Stay up-to-date on new shows airing by following the Innovative Leadership Institute LinkedIn.

Leadership Coaching – Key Factors to Consider When Selecting a Coach

Selecting an effective leadership coach is critical to your success. Here are a few key steps that we recommend focusing on right now to select the best coach for you.

· Determine your overall goal

· Select a coach who has the skills, credentials, and experience to match your needs

· Evaluate the coaches for style and chemistry that work with you.

The following are examples of overall client goals and a sample of the activities they have undertaken with their coaches to meet them.

In future blog posts we will write in greater depth about leadership coach selection including what type of education and experience impacts coaching success.

Choosing a Leadership Coach

 

We recommend that you take time before meeting with your leadership coach to clarify what you would like to accomplish in the sessions since coaching represents an investment of your time and energy. Having your personal goals clearly in mind ill allow you to identify a coach who will be the best fit for your needs at this particular time. There are many talented coaches and many different client goals. Take your time to research your coach and determine a good match based on the criteria that matter to you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To become a more innovative leader, you can begin by taking our free leadership assessments and then enrolling in our online leadership development program.

Check out the companion interview and past episodes of Innovating Leadership, Co-creating Our Future, via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible,  iHeartRADIO, and NPR One.  Stay up-to-date on new shows airing by following the Innovative Leadership Institute LinkedIn.

Setting a Vision For Your Company’s Future

Untitled This blog post is the first in a series of posts that explores my work with MT Business Technologies during our second year of work.  To learn more about the first year, please read the article published in Integral Leadership Review in January 2010.

I met the client at a leadership workshop on developing transformational leadership.  During our first meeting at his office, I met several members of the team, and realized, like many organizations, they were not ecstatic about working with another consultant.   The client is a successful mid-sized business that is focusing on making the changes necessary to maintain their legacy of success well into the future.  This organization will undergo significant changes from a position of strength and success.

About a year ago we had our initial vision setting workshop.   While this blog series is about the yearlong transformation process, this step actually happened prior to the workshop series during our first year of work together.  I wanted to talk about it because it sets the tone for the decisions we made and the actions that guided our first year.

To compare and contrast, I worked with a client organization that did not have a vision, just good people working hard.  What I learned over the short time I worked with this organization was that yes, they did have generally good people and yes they did work hard.  What they also did was work for differing and often competing objectives.  Some people believed their job was to provide basic service at the lowest cost.  Others thought their job was to create a competitive advantage for their company.  The result was a leadership team that did not work well together – no shock – that they thought the others were making poor decisions.  Since they had different goals, everyone was making decisions based on their view of the world. When they took a 360 degree leadership assessment, they ranked each other very poorly.  The composite score for the leaders on “achieves results” was below 10% on a scale of 1-100.  The reason this is important is individually, each of these leaders could produce solid results.  Together, they had differing views of the organization’s goals so they were at odds as a group.

To move beyond this misalignment, the first step is to create a clear picture of the future – to look out on the horizon and identify what the company aspires to be and how they will get there.  The first questions we asked were:

1.    What is our vision?  What will we strive to become?
2.    What is our mission?  What is the clear goal we are trying to achieve by when – this is a stretch.
3.    What are our guiding principles?  What are the core beliefs and values of the organization that guide how we work together?
4.    What are the impacts and outcomes we will deliver?
Once the leadership group agrees on these items the team can move forward.  For this group, the CEO created his initial list and then worked with the company President to refine it and then worked with the leadership team to gain buy-in.  One of the key initiatives was working towards team alignment as they are refining their direction as an organization in this changing environment.  When they decided to change in vision and guiding principles, in some cases they were also committing to run their business differently.

An example for this group is a focus on standardization.  In the past they functioned with unique processes by location.  With the implementation of an enterprise software system designed to gain efficiencies, the group also recognized the need to standardize some processes.   This type of change often means a shift in control from autonomous business leaders to a centralized corporate function.  The team carefully weighed each guiding principle and will continue to experiment over the coming year with the implications of the decisions they made up front.

We look forward to sharing a monthly installment on the journey.  While they have been working over the past year, they are now implementing the changes across the enterprise using a series of monthly workshops that include all senior leaders.  These sessions are designed with an educational component and to generate specific deliverables required to run the business.  Our goal is to make these sessions productive as well as build on the team alignment identified with the new vision, and with each session, placing another foundation stone in the organization renovation.

To become a more innovative leader, you can begin by taking our free leadership assessments and then enrolling in our online leadership development program.

Check out the companion interview and past episodes of Innovating Leadership, Co-creating Our Future, via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible,  iHeartRADIO, and NPR One.  Stay up-to-date on new shows airing by following the Innovative Leadership Institute LinkedIn.

Leading in Uncharted Territory – New Rule #10 – Keep an attitude of experimentation

We do not have “right answers” we have hypotheses to be tested and refined.

organizational transformation In our exploration of Leading in Uncharted Territory, rule 10 is: Keep an attitude of experimentation – we do not have “right answers” we have hypotheses to be tested and refined.

As we think about our current environment where the old rules no longer work and the new rules are not yet tested, we become the scientists proposing new ways of operation and testing them.  It is through our experimentation that we learn what works and what does not.  This means we let go of the idea that we should not make mistakes, rather, like we did in science class, we designed “safe experiments” where we can learn and refine our approach.

If we are paralyzed by “failure” or getting it wrong, we are likely to move slowly and be passed by competitors who have adjusted their thinking and risk tolerance to seek out small experiments and determine in advance acceptable risk.  By changing this orientation, we position ourselves to excel in uncertainty.  It gives us the impetus to explore new ways of doing business, improving our products and services, and revamp our service.

I want to share a personal story in this area.  2008 was a challenging year for our leadership consulting business.  Our team’s concerns about our future direction caused us to really consider a basic SWOT analysis (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats).  We identified several opportunities we had not previously leveraged.  One of these ideas was to teach introductory leadership development classes at little to no cost to gain greater exposure to potential clients.  We tried several configurations and changed them pretty dramatically for the first few times.  We went from a 2 day class to a 4 hour class.  We went from market rate to break even with no compensation for our time.  This latter model worked.  During the past year we added several clients and also a critical member of our team.  We measured leads, relationships developed, clients developed, colleagues developed, strategic alliances developed.

This experiment tested my courage and willingness to present material I was not completely comfortable with.  I was faced with the idea that we could have a class that people would not attend.  What if I build it and they do not come?  I did test with friendly clients first then moved to a broader audience.  I also had trusted colleagues attend each session and give very discerning feedback.  We wanted to know what worked and what did not so we could learn from our experiments and improve.  While I wanted people to say I am wonderful – I wanted even more to tell me where I need to refine my experiment.

Experimentation is an important quality of later stage leadership (Level 5 Leaders).  Leaders at the Individualist and later levels seek feedback aggressively.  This is one quality that allows us to learn quickly and take corrective actions.

In addition to organizational transformation workshops, we launched this blog, developed a structured marketing plan, published several papers, and began expanding our alliances.  Some of these had a quick pay back like the classes and others did not have a visible pay back but we believe they will have a longer term payback.

For me, I needed to try new approaches to business development.  First I evaluated cost in time and money and determined what I was willing to invest.  I measured the impact where I could and took a ruthless approach to evaluation and refinement.  This approach allowed me to make small experiments that we could afford.  Some of them were very effective immediately and others needed significant modification.  The experiments worked. We grew the business significantly and also increased our credibility.

Where are you experimenting with your business?  Are there any areas you could benefit from additional experiments?  Do you encourage curiosity?

Photo Credit:  Jose Kevo

To become a more innovative leader, you can begin by taking our free leadership assessments and then enrolling in our online leadership development program.

Check out the companion interview and past episodes of Innovating Leadership, Co-creating Our Future, via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible,  iHeartRADIO, and NPR One.  Stay up-to-date on new shows airing by following the Innovative Leadership Institute LinkedIn.

By Maureen Metcalf of Innovative Leadership Institute.

Building Resilience So You Can Thrive in Turbulent Times

Resilience is a hot topic these days as people try to figure out how to bend with the winds of economic change without breaking. I’m reading articles that link resilience with positive self-image, courage and commitment, emotional maturity and integrity.
 
The challenge seems to be what to do to develop resilience when yours is getting low.
 
To start down the path of building your resilience and ability to deal with today’s frantic pace of change and stress, there are three practices you can start building immediately.
 
Sleep, Eat, and Be Active
The foundation for resilience is somatic strength, keeping your body healthy and contributing to your energy instead of draining it. For decades we have been hearing about basic stress management techniques: get enough sleep, exercise, eat well. Guess what? It’s all still true.
The latest research tells us that normal adults need 7 – 10 hours of sleep a night, as in every night. No macho points for surviving on 4 -5 hours. Sooner or later it will catch up with you as reduced immune strength, compromised ability to concentrate, anxiety. The list goes on…
Eating well means keeping caffeine to 1-2 cups/cans a day (you won’t need it if you have been getting enough sleep), cutting trans-fats and high fructose corn syrup (it’s in everything packaged), and eating fruit and fresh vegetables every day. And of course, if you still smoke, enroll in a smoking cessation group right now.
 
The balance of this post is located at the blog of our good friend and strategic partner – thoughtLEADERS, LLC. Click here to read further.

To become a more innovative leader, you can begin by taking our free leadership assessments and then enrolling in our online leadership development program.

Check out the companion interview and past episodes of Innovating Leadership, Co-creating Our Future, via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible,  iHeartRADIO, and NPR One.  Stay up-to-date on new shows airing by following the Innovative Leadership Institute LinkedIn.

 

Navigating in Uncharted Territory – Rule #7 – Communicate, Communicate, Communicate

In our exploration of Leading in Uncharted Territory, rule 6 is: Communicate, Communicate, Communicate.
As I think about leading in uncharted territory, I feel a bit like hiking and climbing. I do it, enjoy it, and I move very slowly. It is not very pretty – trying routes, making changes, then trying another. Eventually, I reach my destination and it is always beautiful, being on the top of the mountain.
So, what does this have to do with communication? Leading in this environment is fraught with challenges, as leaders we cannot always see our path clearly. We are trying new approaches to determine what will work the best. At the same time, employees are observing leaders to determine if the path they are being lead down is safe.
During this time when we are the least confident, employees oftenwant more information because they are also less confident. What we communicate and how often needs to change. The number 1 message they need to know is- we are paying attention and they can trust us. Key change messages should convey:
  • I am paying attention to the situation
  • We need to make changes – what we are doing now may not serve us in the future
  • We have a vision for our future
  • We are trying new approaches and we want your input and cooperation
  • We will refine our approach as we go forward to respond to changing conditions – expect these changes to be ongoing
  • We will succeed

The message needs to be conveyed in a way that listeners can hear. The message must be repeated and repeated. Key themes should be woven through all communications to ensure listeners can connect the change program(s) to their daily jobs and organizational success.

Communication should be designed to inspire trust in the process. We are in new territory, things will go wrong as we learn and we will get there safely. Like my rock climbing example, progress can be sporadic, tiring, and less than graceful. The view from the top is always worth the climb – you cannot see it unless you take the journey. Come with me, the leader, on this journey and you will get to see the sun rise over the red rocks – the most amazing view and only seen live if you get up early and take a tough and physically exhausting climb.

I worked with a client now who communicated his new vision for how the organization would function after they implemented an Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) System – Oracle. It became his mantra. He wove these ideas into every discussion. People understood it at different rates and he realized that. He modified his messages to be relevant to each audience. He was patient – while he has talked about this change hundreds of times, it is often the first time for the people he is talking with. He had a rule of 7 – if you communicate 7×7 people will start to understand and adopt what you are proposing. His system was successfully implemented. His communication was clear and consistent and ongoing. He was even filmed by Oracle talking about their system and the implementation.

We all read about the importance of communication. It is critical that the leader be visible during significant changes.. If you do not have the answer, let people know you are working on it. We’ve learned over the years was to wait until we had plans and answers before communicating.. In times of uncertainty, employees want to know what is happening. While this approach is different than what we did in the past – it is important that employees hear what is going on so they can set their expectations and manage their own lives given the information you are sharing. For the most part, they are competent people who want the company to succeed. Trust them enough to give them the information they need to stay engaged and committed to you. If you were in their spot, what would you want to hear to stay engaged and committed?

Photo credit by by Erik Charlton

To become a more innovative leader, you can begin by taking our free leadership assessments and then enrolling in our online leadership development program.

Check out the companion interview and past episodes of Innovating Leadership, Co-creating Our Future, via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible,  iHeartRADIO, and NPR One.  Stay up-to-date on new shows airing by following the Innovative Leadership Institute LinkedIn.

By Maureen Metcalf of Innovative Leadership Institute.

Navigating in Uncharted Territory – Rule #6 – Use Discipline and Rigor While Remaining Nimble

In our exploration of Leading in Uncharted Territory, rule 6 is: use discipline and rigor while remaining nimble.

One of the hallmarks of our time is the level of uncertainty and the unpredictability of our environment. The stock market chase by over 1,000 points in a day. The swings from day to day are often much broader than any time in history. We face a broad range of factors that can significantly impact us and we are not able to predict and control our environment. Factors such as these significantly impact us in multiple ways.
So the question for leaders becomes – how do I make good decisions and run my business effectively? One recommendation I make with regard to decision making is to move from predict and manage to hypothesize and experiment. Basically move toward the scientific method.

The steps of the scientific method are to:

  • Ask a Question
  • Do Background Research
  • Construct a Hypothesis
  • Test Your Hypothesis by Doing an Experiment
  • Analyze Your Data and Draw a Conclusion
  • Communicate Your Results

This approach is beneficial because we can no longer rely on time tested rules and best practices to resolve our challenges. We are truly in a time where new thinking is required to solve our problems. In that context – developing a hypothesis and testing it is likely to help us determine which approaches will work. This process is called often called Structured Thought and Communication in the business community.

So to our recommendation – rigorous and nimble. Rigorous – use data and evidence to prove our hypothesis. That seems to be a hallmark of good science. So how does that connect to nimble? Because the environment is so fluid – solutions we devise today will likely need to be modified in the near future. It is important to create solutions and approaches that can flex and flow with the environment we live in.

We have moved out of a world where we can create long term solutions to some of our challenges. While we need to use a long term vision, many of our solutions will be short term. With the rate of technological advancements now and those predicted in the future – we expect exponential acceleration which means today’s solutions will become obsolete sooner than ever before.

These factors combined require us as leaders to balance long term health and stability of our organizations with shortened lifecyle of products and technologies.

An example of this is MT Business Technologies, a company implementing a technology solution to address current and future challenges. They have identified a cost effective solution to address the rapid pace of change by using a thin client approach. Basically they have all key applications sitting on the main server and not the desktop. This approach allows them to be agile in their response short term and long term. The cost is lower and they are now able to respond quickly to environmental changes. They tested this hypothesis by researching the data and conducting a pilot. They analyzed the results and found their hypothesis to be true. They have communicated and gained approval for their implementation. This solution will allow them to be nimble as an organization and concurrently offer better internal performance to their staff. This is a great example of rigorous and nimble.

photo credit: NIOSH – Nat Inst for Occupational Safety & Health’s photostream

To become a more innovative leader, you can begin by taking our free leadership assessments and then enrolling in our online leadership development program.

Check out the companion interview and past episodes of Innovating Leadership, Co-creating Our Future, via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible,  iHeartRADIO, and NPR One.  Stay up-to-date on new shows airing by following the Innovative Leadership Institute LinkedIn.

By Maureen Metcalf of Innovative Leadership Institute.

Managing in Uncharted Territory – Rule #5 – Develop Comprehensive Solutions

In our exploration of Leading in Uncharted Territory, rule 5 is: develop comprehensive solutions for your opportunities that include people, process, and technology.
Organizations being much more complex than machines because they are filled with people with agendas and human needs. While the machine image may still work, it is important to remember that what appears to be a small change on the surface, most likely impacts people, the business processes or way of getting things done, and the technology (computers, or actual machines).

While we often show the change process as a linear set of activities, my experience with clients tells me that while the emphasis may be placed primarily on either of the 3, people, process or technology, that a change in one leads to a change in all three areas.
Imagine the importance of helping employees understand how their jobs will change when a new computer system is installed and corresponding processes change. This is what I see overlooked the most often.
Another challenge is documenting processes. While this would seem to take time to create and maintain, imagine the disconnects that go undetected. Additionally, what is the impact to your business when a person misses work or leaves the organization.
A simple example of what I do with clients is to get everyone in a room together before we launch a change. We lay the detailed steps of the change out on a spreadsheet and project it on the wall. We than walk through:
  • Who will perform each step?
  • What do they need to make the changes (training, practice)?
  • Does this change impact staffing levels?
  • Can we stop doing anything as a result of this change?
  • Who needs to be informed about the change beyond those doing the work?
  • Does the change as proposed work?
  • What other impacts do you see that we may not have noticed yet?
I have used this process with several clients who are implementing complex computer system changes and it seems to help supervisors and employees work through the changes, identify issues, and feel prepared to successfully accomplish their jobs when the change actually happens. An added benefit – they get to participate in the process and influence the success.
These sessions are scaled to meet the size of the change, for minor changes, they can happen in a very short meeting. For larger changes, the participants dedicate more time. The amount of risk will also impact the amount of time invested in this type of meeting.
Photo credit: Joelmutate

To become a more innovative leader, you can begin by taking our free leadership assessments and then enrolling in our online leadership development program.

Check out the companion interview and past episodes of Innovating Leadership, Co-creating Our Future, via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible,  iHeartRADIO, and NPR One.  Stay up-to-date on new shows airing by following the Innovative Leadership Institute LinkedIn.

By Maureen Metcalf of Innovative Leadership Institute.