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Is your well-intended project oversight actually obstructing progress?

LeadershipThis post was written by guest blogger, Kathleen Starkoff, Founder, President and CEO of Orange Star Consulting in conjunction with an interview on Voice America aired on August 23 How Can You Successfully Implement Large Scale Change?

Most of us have had the occasion to be participants in or witnesses to complex mission-critical system based projects like Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) conversions, company mergers, or acquisitions. Personally, I have engaged in hundreds of complex projects and what often strikes me, is the profound impact that overseeing executives can sometimes play, inadvertently complicating the effort. Have you observed any of these common oversight practices and their unfortunate consequences?

  • Single-dimension coaching is when one parameter, like the implementation date, formally or informally defines success. To be sure, the implementation date is often an important target established, presumably, with good reason. Further, on-time delivery represents a critical and challenging aspect of project management.

A simple and emphatic message like “deliver on time” is compelling. When such a focus is established, well-communicated and emphasized, one can assume that this primary focus will be achieved. Unfortunately, the primary parameter’s success is often achieved at the cost of lesser parameters, like poor quality or missed functionality, the sting of which lives on long after the implementation date.

Leaders who coach from a balanced perspective, understanding and appreciating the interdependencies of dates, plans, scope, and resources, will encourage better holistic outcomes. Further, leaders who support a preemptive plan for talent, time and/or financial contingencies for the inevitable unforeseen circumstance, at levels commensurate with the initiative’s complexity, channels the team’s energy solidly on execution.

  • Overly optimistic coaching is an environment where analysis and reporting tends to be unduly positive because influential leaders, who define the culture, value optimism. In project delivery, like sales and many other business areas, optimism is an important and necessary cultural characteristic.

However, optimism can play an adverse role in decision making when the characteristic is dominant. Project management requires coordinated planning, analysis and realistic progress reporting. When a team is overly-optimistic, and/or hesitant to report failure, the necessary and sensitive synchronization of data is compromised. When such data is then amalgamated across teams of similar optimistic culture, the compromise is magnified. The environment produces a proliferation of “on-target” milestones in project reporting right up until the milestones are unexpectedly missed.

Leaders who engage from a curious (“Tell me what is happening.”) perspective versus a leading from a goal focused (“We are on target, aren’t we?”) perspective, create a safe environment for the messenger to share the unbiased reality of the project. This open and trusted relationship can be replicated across project teams to create a virtuous cycle of fact based data and information. It also encourages the preemptive identification and resolution of issues, minimizing big surprises and increasing the probability of success.

  • System-centric project planning is when a project’s definition of success is the conversion or implementation of a system. That is, after months or years of IT and business engagement, a system goes “live” with a new system or version, which is, statistically speaking, far easier said than done.

But implementing a system without leveraging the opportunity that large scale system change represents is regrettable. It is a terrific people and process change opportunity, work that can be leveraged for real benefit. The work of engagement around design, training and conversion with the business provides the perfect platform for identifying people and process opportunities and integrating the change into the solution. The benefit annuity is squandered, if the success hurdle is simply system related. Instead, system change can and should be used to drive ongoing business benefits of real dollar savings or customer service improvements. It does not make the system change effort any more difficult. Conversely, the addition of these benefit increases business ownership and engagement providing an effective stimulus for the change.

Leaders who engage early in the project construct to define substantial complementary business outcomes measured in specific quantitative and/or qualitative ways will be able to creatively and sustainably address problems or opportunity areas. The business outcome focus will ensure the enthusiastic engagement of all parties through the project’s duration and a vibrant celebration for the resulting annuities brought to life by the system change.

The number of times that I have witnessed these themes carried out in various forms is material. As real and material as the adverse impact on the mission-critical project or the business; in every case, the leader, while well-intentioned in his actions, caused suboptimal project performance, delivery and outcomes.

I have also witnessed these themes performed in the most positive sense. Leaders, who through their visible and vocal sponsorship, seemingly doubled the energy of the project team, enabling impossibly-tall hurdles to be jumped and ridiculously-aggressive deadlines to be met.

Chances are that you have witnessed a bad example, or two, of the above issue causing themes. After reading the related comments and insights, I hope you are one of the leaders who is learning from the errors of others and you are leading in a way that avoids these errors and better yet sets the standard for what is possible! What are you doing to exemplify the positive representation of the themes and the exceptional results? What do you do to encourage others to avoid the pitfalls and learn from the lessons of others?

About the Author

Kathleen Starkoff, Founder, President and CEO of Orange Star Consulting is a cyber security expert, a talented headline speaker and a senior, trusted advisor to CIOs across a wide range of industries, Fortune 500 companies and the National Science Foundation.  Her ability to provide valuable counsel is a result of her 20 years of IT leadership experience in industry-leading organizations including CIO at The Ohio State University, CTO and Enterprise Risk Manager for Limited Brands and CTO of Bank One Corporation.

Ms. Starkoff is a recognized “Leadership Fellow” and a featured cyber security speaker for the National Association of Corporate Directors.  She is also Board Chair-elect and Chair of the Governance and Nominating Board Committee of Flying Horse Farms, part of Paul Newman’s SeriousFun Children’s Network, which provides transformative camp experiences for seriously ill children. She holds a master’s degree in business administration from Case Western Reserve University, and a bachelor’s of science degree, cum laude, in mathematics from Kent State University.

Performance Management AND Coaching Drive Success

Employee EngagementBill goes into his boss’s office to receive feedback on his annual appraisal. He learns that he is meeting expectations, and, subsequently, he is excited to shift his focus to further developing his plan. He is disappointed to learn that performance management only involves determining what he will deliver next year and not at how he can grow in order to expand his capacity to perform better. He feels as though he is falling behind his peers who focus on both performance and development.

I teach a class on managing employee performance and coaching employees that proposes we shift from emphasis on managing performance to emphasis on coaching employees. The Gallup Q12 Meta Analysis in 2013 showed that organizations with engaged employees are 22% more profitable. Employees are more engaged when they feel as though the organization cares about them and their individual development.

Performance management involves setting employee and organizational goals into alignment and providing feedback about performance within those goals. When supervisors connect employee skills with employee goals, employees become more engaged, and the organization benefits. Furthermore, performance management includes identifying the top performers to succeed important roles and identifying the lower performers to receive assistance. The person giving feedback requires proficient skills in evaluating and motivating employees. A strong relationship between manager and employee is necessary when providing effective feedback – this relationship should be one where the employee feels safe receiving constructive criticism and believes that, by making the requested changes, he or she will be rewarded in the future.

To meet stated objectives effectively, improving performance is needed. After employees are able to meet their objectives, it is important to then focus on meeting new goals to continue building employee capacity. At this point, coaching becomes fundamental to the process.

Coaching helps employees achieve their developmental goals beyond their mere ability to perform the job. A coach helps foster an employee’s developmental goals which are typically in sync with organizational goals. Development is vital in order to advance to the next level within an organization. It is also necessary when building skills like executive presence or resilience. The coach can be an employee’s manager or someone in a different reporting line or work group. It is important that the coach and coachee have a strong relationship of trust and respect.

The distinction between performance management and coaching may appear to be one of semantics, but it is nevertheless important. It is important for leaders and managers to have BOTH skills and to know when each skill is best used. When employees are performing poorly, the manager must determine the cause, which is often either a result of a training deficiency or a motivation/engagement gap. Once a manager identifies the cause of the underperformance in an employee he or she can create an improvement plan to help the employee meet the stated goals.

We prepare managers and leaders to

  1. Teach the basics of employee engagement – learn the basics of what engages and disengages people.
  2. Teach performance management basics – understand how the organization’s performance management system is designed. Performance management can have legal and financial implications, so it is important to understand the impact of the actions surrounding this system.
  3. Teach/practice giving and receiving feedback – PRACTICE (capitalized to emphasize skills are developed through ongoing practice) giving and receiving feedback with difficult employees.
  4. Teach coaching basics – practice coaching conversations. Coaching conversations have different objectives, content, and tones. Managers who are good at performance feedback still need to build coaching skills.
  5. Teach/practice coaching – PRACTICE coaching employees who are focused on growth.

For many organizations, employees are the biggest driver of success and, consequently, failure. To outperform competition, investing in employee engagement and development is crucial. If focus on performance management and coaching is mediocre or an afterthought, the ability to deliver positive end results will likely suffer.

To become a more innovative leader, you can begin by taking our free leadership assessments and then enrolling in our online leadership development program.

Check out the companion interview and past episodes of Innovating Leadership, Co-creating Our Future, via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible,  iHeartRADIO, and NPR One.  Stay up-to-date on new shows airing by following the Innovative Leadership Institute LinkedIn.

If you are interested in receiving our ongoing blog series or other articles by email, please sign up in the box on the right labeled Get Email Updates From Us.

photo credit: www.flickr.com get everwise

Tool to Build Resilience – Find Your Feet

Feet cc Jonathan Cohen

Today’s post is written by Virginia Macali, a member of our consulting team and also the Founder of High Point Transitions.

VUCA. Volatile. Uncertain. Complex. Ambiguous. This is an acronym created by the US Army War College to describe the state of our world today. Leaders in business, government, and non-profit organizations are very familiar with VUCA. This level of constant disruption pervades the workplace with a powerful undercurrent. As leaders, we’re thrown off center many times a day from large challenges such as changing economic conditions to policy and priority changes. We are thrown off center by smaller challenges like too many emails to respond to, interruptions, or running late for a meeting.

Leaders are hungry for ways to deal with VUCA. They have found that pushing harder does little to stem the tide of the disturbance. At a recent program on Resilience for Leaders for the Leadership Challenge for Ohio Job and Family Services, we taught leaders how to use the body to calm the mind. One of the practices is called Find Your Feet. Here are the instructions:

Find your feet touching the floor. Press your feet into the floor. Focus on any sensations in your feet. Feel the soles of your feet. Feel your toes. Feel the whole foot.

This simple practice can be done in a minute or less. It may bring a sense of grounding, quiet the mind, and interrupt habitual patterns. People who use this practice report feeling more resourceful, more clear-thinking, and take effective action with greater ease. This is a practice that can be done anywhere, requires no special equipment, and is always available.

The day after the program, David Sapper, the director of The Leadership Challenge, gave an example of how this practice worked. As he described how mentors would be matched with participants, tension increased in the room. David invited everyone to stand and Find Your Feet. Within minutes, tension was reduced, participants felt calmer, and the matching process was smooth and successful.

The next time you feel tension rising, take a minute to Find Your Feet.

To become a more innovative leader, you can begin by taking our free leadership assessments and then enrolling in our online leadership development program.

Check out the companion interview and past episodes of Innovating Leadership, Co-creating Our Future, via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible,  iHeartRADIO, and NPR One.  Stay up-to-date on new shows airing by following the Innovative Leadership Institute LinkedIn.

If you are interested in receiving our ongoing blog series or other articles by email, please sign up in the box on the right labeled Get Email Updates From Us.

photo credit: www.flickr.com Jonathan Cohen

Innovative Leadership Workbook for Nonprofit Executives Awarded 2012 Best Business Reference Book

USA Best Book Award WinnerMetcalf & Associates, Inc., today announced that Innovative Leadership Workbook for Nonprofit Executives, written by CEO Maureen  Metcalf and Dani A. Robbins, was named USA Books 2012 Best Business Reference Book. The book was also a finalist in Business: Management & Leadership.

“Leadership needs innovation the way   innovation demands leadership. By combining them, you improve your capacity to deliver results and your organization’s capacity to affect change,” says Metcalf. The Innovative Leadership Workbook for Nonprofit Executives, provides a six-step process for developing innovative leadership qualities through a combination of well-researched theory, a practical business case study, and corresponding tools and templates.

It is designed specifically for busy nonprofit executives, includes field-tested processes and worksheets for innovating how you lead, transforming your organization, and creating sustainability. The workbook takes readers on their own leadership journey through a series of development activities while providing insight into the   thought processes of a highly successful nonprofit executive whose unique challenges provide invaluable insight into how a leader develops and incorporates innovation both personally and professionally.

“The Innovative Leadership Workbook for Nonprofit Executives lays out a process for transformation, including a discussion of organizational culture, an exploration of, and tools for, improving personal and professional leadership style, and an in-depth description of the role of the nonprofit CEO. This is a must-read for senior leadership staff and the boards they serve.” —John Hrusovsky, former CEO, GroundWork group.

Robbins is the founder of Non Profit Evolution, a consulting firm providing board governance and operational assistance to nonprofit organizations.

To become a more innovative leader, you can begin by taking our free leadership assessments and then enrolling in our online leadership development program.

Check out the companion interview and past episodes of Innovating Leadership, Co-creating Our Future, via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible,  iHeartRADIO, and NPR One.  Stay up-to-date on new shows airing by following the Innovative Leadership Institute LinkedIn.

Coaching to Solve Structural Problems = Fail

As a leadership coach, I see great value in the impact that coaching provides—when the problem is accurately identified and coaching is the right solution. Just like any other business problem, it is important that the leader receiving coaching understands the issue, agrees with the issue, and agrees to engage in the coaching process. The caveat is, however, that it may not always be only the individual who needs to evolve, and that the solution must fit the issue!

I worked with a very talented leader who was encouraged to get coaching because of some challenges in his organization. While he certainly benefited from an outside perspective and additional tools to enhance his leadership, coaching was not a solution to the organization’s key issues because the problems were structural in nature. So, regardless of how long and to what extent the leader was coached, the issue was systemic. He was affected by it, but wasn’t the root of the issue.

Employees circumvented the leader when they did not like what he said or did, and complained about his effectiveness. When the leader’s boss allowed this to happen on a regular basis, he undermined the leader’s authority with the staff. When staff later failed to deliver results, the leader was seen as a failed leader.

Had the leader’s boss been willing to work with the leader to address employee issues and had both of them worked with the coach to stop staff from going around the leader, the organization would have produced much higher results. By labeling the leader as a low performer, the organization lost a great deal of productivity from the leader and staff—yet the core issues still remain unresolved.

How do you avoid this and other energy-wasting pitfalls?

  1. Engage the leader and his boss in the coaching process
  2. Diagnose the “bigger” issues—both individual and organizational
  3. Remain curious about how to improve overall organizational effectiveness
  4. Look for other symptoms of structural issues. Is this leader the first to show signs that have the potential to become pervasive?
  5. Treat leaders who have the courage to improve themselves and their organizations with the respect they deserve—it’s hard work!

As our organizations feel ongoing pressure from tightened budgets, the necessity of staying current with technology, and increased competition, we will see more signs of breakdown.

These often look like “leadership problems.” Upon deeper examination, they may be a combination of a need for the leader to grow and the organization to change to meet evolving demands. Coaching and transformation is most effective when both the leader and the organization change concurrently.

To become a more innovative leader, you can begin by taking our free leadership assessments and then enrolling in our online leadership development program.

Check out the companion interview and past episodes of Innovating Leadership, Co-creating Our Future, via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible,  iHeartRADIO, and NPR One.  Stay up-to-date on new shows airing by following the Innovative Leadership Institute LinkedIn.

 

Leadership Boosts the Bottom Line

The Seventh Annual Hay Group Study finds leadership boosts the bottom line. Best companies outperform the S&P 500 almost 2x over 10 years.  The study was quite comprehensive and the key findings worth reading.  We will focus on a small subset in this post.

According to the study, “The Best Companies for Leadership distinguish themselves by their ability to develop well-rounded, multifaceted talent within their organizations,” said Susan Snyder, senior principal in Hay Group’s Leadership and Talent practice and co-leader of the Best Companies for Leadership Study. “As innovation increasingly becomes a key differentiator for companies worldwide, best-in-class organizations are doing more to train and develop their people, celebrate diversity, reward collaboration and establish an environment that fosters innovation, creating a competitive advantage in the marketplace.”

In fact, the Best Companies for Leadership consistently outperform their peers. Over a 10 year period, the Top 20 companies produced a 5.39 percent shareholder return, compared to a 2.92 percent shareholder return generated by the S&P 500.

You have heard this before and here is another study that confirms what you either knew or imagined to be true.  So, what do you do about it?  You may not work for one of the global top 20 best companies and yet you want to improve how you lead.  What can you do?

  1. Buy the Innovative Leadership Fieldbook (I know blatant self-promotion) or upcoming workbooks (the series will create the pathway to develop innovative leadership from individual contributor  through executive). These books provide a comprehensive approach and worksheets that are self-paced and cost effective.
  2. Form a “book  club” for leadership development – create a group of colleagues and peers who have a shared desire to improve. It can be people within your company or outside.
  3. Develop practices or routines that support your ability to refine how you lead and sustain the changes long term.
  4. Teach others what you are learning-  by teaching it you will learn more.
  5. Create a culture that supports the changes you are making – not just for yourself but for as much of the organization as you can influence.
  6. Evaluate the performance management systems within your purview and ensure they support the leadership changes you are making in yourself and encouraging others to make.
  7. Take a class that helps you build on your strength or fill a gap.
  8. Work with a coach.

There are lots of barriers that get in our way and yet, most of us have the ability to take some small action every day to move forward and become a much stronger leader. What can you do today? tomorrow? next week?  What can you do to remove the barriers to taking small steps?

To become a more innovative leader, you can begin by taking our free leadership assessments and then enrolling in our online leadership development program.

Check out the companion interview and past episodes of Innovating Leadership, Co-creating Our Future, via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible,  iHeartRADIO, and NPR One.  Stay up-to-date on new shows airing by following the Innovative Leadership Institute LinkedIn.

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Who Is Your Biggest Competitor?

I am kicking off a series of blog posts talking about challenges I see in coaching successful leaders looking to “up their game”.  We use the Innovative Leadership Fieldbook as the foundation for much of our approach.  This first post talks about leaders who are too competitive within their small group.

Our leader is being groomed for a senior leadership role in a major university. He is known for getting significant results often with limited financial resources and little political support. Now that he is moving into a more visible role, his prior behaviors will no longer serve him.

In this case, he took a 360 degree assessment that gave numeric scores and written comments from his boss, peers, and subordinates. He learned from this that his aggressive tactics have undermined him with his peers. They saw him as acting in his personal interest and the interest of his immediate team over the interest of the broader department. He used the feedback and insight to become much more aware of his actions and the impact they have on how others view him.

Based on what he learned during the assessment phase, he took action.  He made significant progress in rebuilding several key relationships and is also building a broader base of support across the university. His self-awareness provided him the foundation to make very different choices in how he relates to peers and people who will become his peers when he is promoted.

Result:  he is much more of a team player, considering the needs of the group and how he can work with others to accomplish a much broader goal than the ones he was accomplishing only a few months ago.  During a recent feedback discussion with one of his key stakeholders, he got very positive feedback about the changes others are seeing and the increased impact he is having across the organization.

Who do you define as your competition? Is it your coworkers? Your subordinates? What would happen to your business relationships and organizational success if you look more broadly at who is “in your circle” and who your competition really should be?

To become a more innovative leader, you can begin by taking our free leadership assessments and then enrolling in our online leadership development program.

Check out the companion interview and past episodes of Innovating Leadership, Co-creating Our Future, via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible,  iHeartRADIO, and NPR One.  Stay up-to-date on new shows airing by following the Innovative Leadership Institute LinkedIn.

To receive future blog posts in your mailbox, enter your name in the subscribe box on the right column.

Mike Sayre – Leading with Purpose

In our ongoing series of blog posts about Inspirational Leaders, this post features Mike Sayre talking to a Capital University MBA class. Mike’s sense of vision and professional integrity has long provided a role model for many in the community. He is a regular speaker in my MBA class sharing his experiences with these emerging executives. Following is an excerpt from his inspirational presentation in his own words:

I only have one major point to make tonight…if you want people to follow your lead in and out of turbulent times, you need to lead consistently and decisively no matter what your business or the economy throws at you, and that all starts with tying why you work to why you live and your own personal purpose in life.

In March of 2006, I was asked to step up from my CFO role and take a bigger role in the company as its CEO, working arm and arm with the founder and chairman to develop and implement a new strategy for profitable growth. This was my first CEO job. And for all of my 25+ years of leadership experience starting and growing companies, I was not totally prepared for my new role! Somebody else had always been the CEO! Well, I learned an awful lot over those four years, in and out of turbulent times, while we achieved record earnings, expanded our operations into Europe and Asia and built a high performance organization highly acclaimed by some of the largest electronics manufacturing companies in the world!

Why was I unprepared and what did I do to successfully lead the organization in these unprecedented achievements for PDSi? I began to get it when my executive coach back in 2006, told me “You can’t lead others if you can’t lead yourself.” Then he pushed me, kicking and screaming, into writing my deepest feelings, thoughts and beliefs all out.  In several 2-6 hour intervals over a couple of months, I wrote, unfettered by form and content, about why I lived and why I worked…pages and pages, streaming thought processes that no one will ever read. This was for me and no one else and I gained clarity about my personal purpose I never had before.

Weeks after, I was asked about a mission and vision for the company. So I used the clarity that had come from my writings and to develop a simple philosophy card. The card spelled out a mission to improve the lives of our shareholders, customers, associates, suppliers and communities in which we live, a vision to be the best in the business at developing collaborative technology solutions for leading technology companies, and operating guidelines based on the Golden Rule of treating others like we would like to be treated. This process of writing it all out and then organizing and reducing it all down to fit on a small card absolutely aligned my work and my life and gave me a sense of my own personal purpose I never had before.

My basic DNA did not change! However, my level of understanding and passion about why I lived and worked, how we should work together and with others, giving back to the community and the importance of the alignment between my life and my work (a lot less balancing!) became very clear.

That understanding and passion made me ever more fully committed to my life and to my work as part of my life. I immediately empowered myself to prioritize work and family time, events and challenges as time and events in my life without trying to constantly “balance” between my work and my life! Sometimes work gets more time than family and sometimes family gets more time than work…it depends on what’s going on, but I look at it all as my life, not my life and then separately my work.

Another advantage of the card was that I/we could use it as a tool for consistent communications and decision-making. “Treating others like we’d like to be treated” had a way of making very difficult decisions much easier and quicker, taking less of a toll on the rest of my life.

So if you’ve never done it before, set aside meaningful time (ASAP) and fully answer in writing the following questions, without concern for form and content (just write and spend some time on it…):

  • Why do you live? Then keep asking yourself why you gave that answer and continue writing your answers in great detail (a minimum of 5 “whys”) until you get to the real core of your beliefs and motivations.
  • Why do you work? Same process with the minimum 5 “whys.”

Then, if you can’t tie why you are living to why you are working today, figure out how you get those two more in alignment! Give your life and your work more meaning and collapse them into one co-mingled set of priorities and challenges, rather than constantly striving to “balance” between them…be committed to BOTH and prioritize accordingly.

Do you have a personal purpose statement?  Our leadership coaches are available to help you explore your purpose and principles.  This is often the fist step in our leadership coaching process.

To become a more innovative leader, you can begin by taking our free leadership assessments and then enrolling in our online leadership development program.

Check out the companion interview and past episodes of Innovating Leadership, Co-creating Our Future, via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible,  iHeartRADIO, and NPR One.  Stay up-to-date on new shows airing by following the Innovative Leadership Institute LinkedIn.

Jack Welch at World Business Forum 2010 – CEO Number 1 Job is Leadership

Jack Welsh, World Business Forum 2010Jack Welch former CEO of GE and top selling author of Winning spoke at the World Business Forum 2010 hitting the topic of Management Fundamentals and success.  Key points of his message were very close to the themes from Jim Collins, author of Good to Great.  Collins is primarily a researcher and Welch is primarily a CEO.  They both focus heavily on the importance of leadership, growing your people, creating a vision, establishing clear process and accountability to move the business forward consistently.

1.  My main job as CEO is fielding the best talent.   Most managers are not getting this!  There is no where enough attention to leadership development.  What keeps people from doing this?  Insecurity.   Boards not paying enough attention and allowing this to continue.

2.  Rank and build talent.   We are not spending enough time focused on those doing a great job because we are focused on improving the bottom 10%.  We need to celebrate the winners and helping others understand how to be top performers.  Those who are not winners here will likely become winners when they find where they best fit.  Teams perform better when we build on the talent and cut those not meeting the performance standards.

3.  You Must add value beyond what is there. When asked a question from the audience about a new product – his response was clear – we must all be focusing on adding value.  Do not invest resources unless there is a real need.

4.  Technology creates opportunities to gain efficiencies and improve customer intimacy. His reference to technology is as an enabler to make large businesses more effective and efficient and thus more competitive.  With growing competition we need to leverage technology.  For most companies it is not our business, it improves our business and must be seen through that lens.

5.  Fear is dead as a management tool.  You better have a vision and be able to communicate what is in it for others if you want them to follow you.  Transparency – everyone knows everything now.  As a Leader, you better have real logic behind the decisions rather than just your title.

6.  I see a different world going forward.  People have changed habits.  People are doing more with less.  As an economy, we are moving to a 2-3% growth rate.  People are buying fewer services, using less labor, and using fewer materials.  Technology is on exponential growth path changing how work is done.  The combination of these 2 factors:  lower demand and more technology mandates we change how we do business.   It calls for real innovation to improve efficiency.

By putting the right leaders in place and maintaining consistent focus on their continued growth – even when they are the best in class – you will WIN as a business and we will win as a country.

To become a more innovative leader, you can begin by taking our free leadership assessments and then enrolling in our online leadership development program.

Check out the companion interview and past episodes of Innovating Leadership, Co-creating Our Future, via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible,  iHeartRADIO, and NPR One.  Stay up-to-date on new shows airing by following the Innovative Leadership Institute LinkedIn.

Leadership Coaching – Key Factors to Consider When Selecting a Coach

Selecting an effective leadership coach is critical to your success. Here are a few key steps that we recommend focusing on right now to select the best coach for you.

· Determine your overall goal

· Select a coach who has the skills, credentials, and experience to match your needs

· Evaluate the coaches for style and chemistry that work with you.

The following are examples of overall client goals and a sample of the activities they have undertaken with their coaches to meet them.

In future blog posts we will write in greater depth about leadership coach selection including what type of education and experience impacts coaching success.

Choosing a Leadership Coach

 

We recommend that you take time before meeting with your leadership coach to clarify what you would like to accomplish in the sessions since coaching represents an investment of your time and energy. Having your personal goals clearly in mind ill allow you to identify a coach who will be the best fit for your needs at this particular time. There are many talented coaches and many different client goals. Take your time to research your coach and determine a good match based on the criteria that matter to you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To become a more innovative leader, you can begin by taking our free leadership assessments and then enrolling in our online leadership development program.

Check out the companion interview and past episodes of Innovating Leadership, Co-creating Our Future, via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible,  iHeartRADIO, and NPR One.  Stay up-to-date on new shows airing by following the Innovative Leadership Institute LinkedIn.