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Bob Irwin – Human Change Follows a Predictable Process and Takes Time

Bob Irwin presented at the TechColumbus Leadership Series where veteran “business builders” shared their philosophies in a conversational setting.  This event is sponsored by Vorys.

Mr. Irwin is the President of TDCI, a company providing enterprise technology solutions and services since 1992. Bob has worked in several senior roles, such as President and CEO of Sterling Commerce from 2007 until Sterling Commerce was acquired by IBM in 2010. In that role, he was responsible for driving company vision, growth, and profitability. He provided strategic leadership in articulating the vision, transforming the company’s software delivery efforts, and building strategic partnerships.

My intent in blogging about these events is to share with others what successful CEOs share in small group discussions. Bob has successfully grown multiple businesses and was willing to share openly what worked and what did not. It is this candid information that I hope is valuable for you as the reader. Because I assume you have a sense of basic leadership principles, I will focus my comments on things that may not be discussed as openly in other settings with the intent of making this blog something other than a rehash of the same stuff you have read elsewhere.

Bob talked about a couple of items that struck me as really interesting, so I will focus on those. The first is the idea of people with a very high achievement desire moving to a level in an organization where they are acting for the good of the organization and teaching others to perform by asking the right high level questions. The irony of this is that the thing that gets us to the senior role is the very thing that will cause us to under-perform in this role. He had two major points that sounded very much like characteristics we associate with “level 5 leadership” as referenced by Jim Collins. They are:

  • Move your behavior beyond personal achievement to doing what is right for the organization. This sounds easy, yet the example is: When someone comes to you with something you could do in 15 minutes and you know it will take much longer for that person to accomplish the task, how do you encourage him to build his skills and give him the time and support to succeed?
  • Move beyond telling people how to do their jobs to asking them what they recommend? By placing the primary focus on the question: what are you trying to accomplish? then why? then how?, you will help your team build independent thinking, business acumen, and problem solving management skills. You are building and leading your team toward roles as managers and leaders.

The second point and the one I found really interesting was what he called the human dynamic dilemma, shown in the image above (click to see full screen). The foundation of this concept is that there is a natural evolution people go through in the process of making a change. Change management professionals often call this “the change curve,” and it takes people from hearing about changes through a structured process until they actually make the change. Bob made the point that this process happens in about six to eight quarters which I thought was the most important point.  I have worked on several change initiatves but have rarely heard a specific time assigned to the change process. His experience indicated that about half way through a transition, at about the one year mark, leaders are generally frustrated that they are repeating themselves often and their people are just “not getting it.” At this point leaders often change direction because they did not achieve success in a year (which seems like an eternity when reporting quarterly results). Now, as the team is just beginning to understand and believe in the new direction, they are faced with another new direction. They immediately return back to step one – hearing about a new direction, but now with much less trust of the leader—and the journey that would have originally taken six to eight quarters could take twice as long. Leaders are thinking the team does not get it, and the team could be thinking a range of things including, “we will wait them out and they will change direction again so why make the effort.”

Some cautions in taking his comments out of context as blanket guidelines:

  • If you decide to change direction at the one year point, make sure it is a required change to accomplish the mission. Do not change because it seems to be taking too long and you think taking another direction might solve the problem. Remember that the time line will reset and be longer each time you start over.
  • Another point Bob made was do not fire people because they are “not getting it.” The cost of severance packages added to recruiting and training costs are quite high, and you are altering the lives of individuals and families. He gave an example where he worked with a leadership team that replaced a large percentage of an organization and the extreme adverse impact this had on the overall organization. His telling of this seemed to strike a chord with everyone in the room, as we have all had these issues and concerns. I happened to have this conversation with a client a couple of hours before his talk (who was one year into the change process). Our business community often assumes that if change is too slow, the team must be the problem. That said my personal belief is that there are times when someone is not willing or able to change as much as the organization requires. If someone is being disruptive or cannot be placed in a job where he will meet expectations after a reasonable time he simply needs to leave in a respectfully managed transition process. These are the exceptions and not the rule.
  • When asked if there is any way to accelerate the process he said “fake it till you make it.” Act in the new way as you are making the internal transition through the change curve. It is Bob’s belief that this can accelerate the process and yet do not believe that just because people are demonstrating the new behavior that it means they are fully committed if they are “faking it”.

I would add one other recommendation to this: transparency in communication. We, as leaders, often create the expectation that we are implementing a change and employees think we should immediately “get it right.” This is an unreasonable standard. Using a messages like “we are making changes and I am learning along the way, so you will see me using new behaviors just as I am asking you to do; You will see me make mistakes along the way just as you will; If you see me doing something that contradicts what I have said, you are welcome to point this out to me because habits are formed by ongoing practice and everyone will be practicing different things at different times.” Honest and transparent messages such as these may make a tremendous difference in employees getting on board and adapting.

So, as you are making changes, there are things that you will need to set the direction and stay the course for the six to eight quarters to move an initiative forward. And within that change, you will be making many small changes and course corrections. If you are using an “agile” approach, you will have ongoing releases or changes, and they should be steps forward toward the overall direction. If this is the case, it will be important to communicate on an ongoing basis how each change or series of changes is moving the overall initiative forward.

To become a more innovative leader, you can begin by taking our free leadership assessments and then enrolling in our online leadership development program.

Check out the companion interview and past episodes of Innovating Leadership, Co-creating Our Future, via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible,  iHeartRADIO, and NPR One.  Stay up-to-date on new shows airing by following the Innovative Leadership Institute LinkedIn.

Innovative Leadership to Navigate Uncertainty

Are your leadership actions impeding innovation?  Are your change initiatives successfully implemented and delivering the benefits you expected?  How is YOUR behavior impacting their ability to delivery results?

Many traditional leaders spend more time perfecting their golf swings than they do improving their ability to lead in this current environment.  The most successful leaders continue to improve their leadership skills including the level of self-knowledge and introspection that provides a feedback loop for ongoing improvement.

Innovative leadership is the type of leadership that allows already successful leaders to raise the bar on their performance and the performance of their organizations.

An innovative leader is defined as someone who consistently delivers results using the following:

  • Strategic leadership that inspires individual goals and organizations vision and cultures;
  • Tactical leadership that influences an individual’s actions and the organizations systems and processes.
  • Holistic Leadership that aligns all key dimensions:  Individual, culture, action and systems.

While others differentiate leadership from management this definition includes both because, to fully implement innovative change, the organizational leaders need to both set the strategy and be sufficiently involved in the tactics to ensure innovation and changes happen.  This does not mean micro managing – it means an awareness and involvement in all elements of the innovation and change process. This includes continually growing and evolving leadership capacity and actions, leading and implementing culture and system changes within the organization.

Let’s look at an example of a leader who faced a change she had not previously faced in her business.  She runs Working Partners, an organization focusing on creating drug free workplaces.  She built a strong successful business and yet, external pressures changed her market.  The government provided many of these services at a lower cost.  Being a very innovative leader, she worked with her immediate team and sought external input on possible options.

As of this writing, she is launching multiple pilot projects that will enhance and/or change her company and its offerings.  They will take the results of the pilots and determine how to refine the course of the business to ensure long term organizational success and customer service.

It is important to note that some of these pilots reflect small changes based on distribution channel and methods of delivery.  Others seem radical and include significant expansion of the organization’s mission.  Because the founder, Dee Mason, is proactive and open to exploring a broad range of changes, she will find a series of innovations that allow the organization to thrive.  Part of her success in making significant change will include looking at the entire system to make holistic changes including how she herself leads the organization.  This is one of the qualities that is unique to innovative leaders, they are continually looking at who they are in the context of the organization and they continue to change and grow as they change their organizations.

What are specific qualities that differentiate an innovative leader from a traditional leader? In our time of rapid business, social and ecological change, a successful leader is a leader who can continually:

  • Clarify and effectively articulate vision
  • Link that vision to attainable strategic initiatives
  • Develop themselves and influence the development of other leaders
  • Build effective teams by helping colleagues enact their own leadership strengths
  • Cultivate alliances and partnerships
  • Anticipate and respond to both challenges and opportunities aggressively
  • Develop robust and resilient solutions
  • Develop and test hypothesis like a scientist
  • Measure, learn, and refine on an ongoing basis

To further illustrate some of the qualities of innovative leadership, we offer this comparison between traditional leadership and innovative leadership:

We keep hearing that the world is changing and it is.  The question for you is what will you do to lead the thinking and changes in these times rather than talking about how tough it is?  Will you be an innovator or a barrier to innovation?  The Innovative Leadership Fieldbook provides easy to use tools and reflection questions that lead you through a six step process to become a more innovative leader.

 

At Metcalf & Associaes, we are dedicated to inspiring leadership innovation within complex business environments. Our book, Innovative Leadership Fieldbook can be purchased on Amazon.  If you want to test how innovative you are as a leader, consider taking our free on-line Innovative Leadership assessment. Metcalf & Associates offers assessments, coaching and workshops to help you and your leadership team become more innovative.

Photo credit:  nyoin flickr

To become a more innovative leader, you can begin by taking our free leadership assessments and then enrolling in our online leadership development program.

Check out the companion interview and past episodes of Innovating Leadership, Co-creating Our Future, via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible,  iHeartRADIO, and NPR One.  Stay up-to-date on new shows airing by following the Innovative Leadership Institute LinkedIn.

Innovative Leadership –Evolve your Ability to Innovate

How often have you seen organizations launch an innovative product with minimal impact because the leader running the initiative is stuck in an outdated mindset?  The goal of Innovative Leadership is to help leaders develop innovative thinking and practices that align all areas of the business and are at least as forward thinking as the products and processes they are trying to implement.

As you think about the opposite of innovative leadership and consider why it might be useful for your organizaiton, think about an improvement or change you were excited about and the organization’s leadership thinking and behavior slowed the progress.

How, I would like to give an example of innovative leadership.  A group of executives left a mid-size traditional business to start a technology company.  They are now on plan to deliver the technology services and just landed their first international client.  The leaders, who started the company, demonstrated innovative leadership qualities over the next year by launching an offering they believed in, hiring innovative people, and creating a culture and systems that supported the new offering.  The new company, Haladon Technologies, Inc is successful on all traditional business measures from financial, customer satisfaction, employee satisfaction and being a socially conscious business partner.

What did they do that the parent company did not?  They practiced innovative leadership.  Successful, sustainable innovation starts with the leaders taking an innovative approach to leadership as well as services, products and business processes.

We define innovative leadership as:

  • Strategic leadership that inspires individual goals and organizations vision and cultures;
  • Tactical leadership that influences an individual’s actions and the organizations systems.
  • Holistic Leadership that aligns all key dimensions:  Individual, cultural, behavioral and systematic.

Despite their collective importance, conventional applications of leadership and innovation have often proved elusive and even problematic in real-world scenarios.  For example: if the leadership team of a struggling organization drives initiatives that focus solely on innovative changes to incentives, products, and services—without also advancing  strategic purpose and team effectiveness—they will still miss the vast potential to create meaningful growth. Productivity and system improvements are undoubtedly critical, but how employees engage with their work experience is equally vital.  Implementing innovation in the areas of products and services   without also addressing the team environment and support of company culture can often result in lop-sided decision making and short-sighted leadership.

Knowing that the future of organizations is irreversibly tied to a world of erratic change, you can no longer afford to improve your systems and offerings without equally advancing your capacity for leadership. Qualities such as empathy and the ability to inspire cultural alignment offer your organization significant merit, and need to be implemented as shrewdly as strategic planning.

Innovative leadership requires you to transform the way you perceive others, your businesses and yourself as a leader. By vigorously looking into your own experience—including motivations, inclinations, interpersonal skills and proficiencies—you can optimize your effectiveness in ways that are deeply resonate with your work.  It is important to balance the technical and functional skills you have acquired with meaningful introspection, all the while setting the stage for further growth.  In essence, you discover how to strategically and tactically innovate the way you perform every part of your business.

Innovative leadership is inspiring strategy and influencing implementation through an explicit balancing of four core dimensions: Individual, cultural, behavioral and systematic.

Are you considering improving your ability to be an innovative leader?  If so, take this free on-line Innovative Leadership assessment to determine where you fall on the innovative leadership scale.  If you are looking for tools to help develop you ability to be an innovative leader, check out the Innovative Leadership Fieldbook.  Metcalf & Associates offers assessments, coaching and workshops to help you and your leadership team become more innovative.

By Maureen Metcalf & Mark Palmer

Photocredit:  mikeblogs

To become a more innovative leader, you can begin by taking our free leadership assessments and then enrolling in our online leadership development program.

Check out the companion interview and past episodes of Innovating Leadership, Co-creating Our Future, via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible,  iHeartRADIO, and NPR One.  Stay up-to-date on new shows airing by following the Innovative Leadership Institute LinkedIn.

Michael Glimcher – Culture Differentiates

Michael P. Glimcher,Chairman of the Board of Glimcher Realty Trust spoke at the TechColumbus 2011 Leadership Series meeting sponsored by Vorys.  Michael has been a trustee of the Company since June 1997, was appointed President of the Company in December 1999, and appointed Chief Executive Officer in January 2005.

Glimcher Realty Trust is a retail real estate investment trust (REIT) and a recognized leader in the ownership, management, acquisition and development of malls, including enclosed regional malls and open-air lifestyle centers, as well as community centers.  Glimcher Realty Trust, as the company has been known since 1994, is a public company and controls from its Downtown headquarters a portfolio of 26 shopping centers across the U.S.

A Brief History

“I drove out here from Boston to visit a relative,” recalls Herbert Glimcher, who founded The Glimcher Company, the REIT’s predecessor, in 1959. “I had $50 in my pocket.”  The company began building fast food stores including McDonald’s and strip centers.  In the 1980s the company developed its first enclosed malls, including Indian Mound Mall and River Valley Mall, and has since built Polaris Fashion Place and acquired Eastland Mall. Since the company went public in 1994, Glimcher shifted from a focus of being a development company to being an operating company.  With this shift, it was important to change the company function, its leadership team and its culture.

Leadership in Tough Times

Fresh on the heels of the Great Recession, senior leaders are changing their perspective. They have managed their companies through a period of sustained and painful adversity. They have a heightened awareness of what makes sense — and what doesn’t — for their businesses.   They are keenly aware that success in the new era will require new skills and capabilities.

Michael talked about the tough economy and the tough lessons that allowed Glimcher to endure the economic crisis and position them for success going forward.  He shared some of his lessons learned over the past 15 years.

Given the latest research by Gallup on employee engagement and the importance of working for a supervisor who cares, Michael’s emphasis on creating a nice culture is a differentiator for Glimcher.  What Michael calls “nice” is described by Gallup in the following questions (this list includes 4 of their 12 key questions to evaluate engagement):

  • In the last seven days, I received recognition or praise for doing good work
  • My supervisor, or someone at work, cares about me as a person
  • Someone at work encourages my development
  • At work, my opinions seem to count

In a world where we face a great deal of uncertainty in all areas of our lives, Glimcher promotes a culture of respect resulting in greater employee engagement, greater productivity and greater customer satisfaction.  All of these contribute to company sustainability and success.

As with other successful leaders, Michael has focused his attention on knowing his business, hiring the right leader and creating a culture and systems that promote effective operations.  Additionally, he built a company that supports the wellbeing of his associates and the community.

What is next?  Michael is looking at “infill sites” and acquisitions as key drivers for the next 3-5 years.

For more information on Glimcher, http://www.glimcher.com.

To become a more innovative leader, you can begin by taking our free leadership assessments and then enrolling in our online leadership development program.

Check out the companion interview and past episodes of Innovating Leadership, Co-creating Our Future, via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible,  iHeartRADIO, and NPR One.  Stay up-to-date on new shows airing by following the Innovative Leadership Institute LinkedIn.

How Healthy is Your Organization?

Is your business healthy?As we start the New Year with organizational goals, annual financial plans and individual goals, a key question is where do we spend our limited time and money to drive the greatest organizational success?  How do you know what is working well?  What is working but causing other organizational problems?

We recommend a 5 part health check to help you focus your energies.   The process takes you through a diagnostic that identifies areas of risk along with strengths to leverage.

  1. Evaluate your leadership – do you have the right people in the rights spots?  How do you define right?
  2. Do you have a mission, vision, guiding principles and organizational outcomes clearly defined?  Do they tell your employees what they are working toward?  Do they tell your customers what they can expect you to deliver?
  3. Do you have a clearly defined operating model that supports your organization delivering results efficiently and effectively?
  4. Based on the prior analysis – did you identify key strengths to leverage and weaknesses to be mitigated?
  5. What do you measure?  Are you tracking performance against all key measures – more than just financial performance?  Do you have a system in place to take corrective action based on your scorecard?

We are going through this process with our own organization right now along with client organizations.  While we tend to set goals and monitor our progress regularly, we are finding this diagnosis helpful in identifying strengths.  One thing we will do is put some of our tools online for our clients to use free of charge like our resilience assessment.  We use this tool with clients to help them identify where they are resilient and where to pay attention to risk areas.  We have a large suite of tools we developed for client use but have not shared them widely enough.  We will continue to look for additional ways to leverage our strengths as well as close the gap on our weaknesses.

If you are interested in scheduling your organization’s health check to increase your success, contact us.

photo credit: johansonin

To become a more innovative leader, you can begin by taking our free leadership assessments and then enrolling in our online leadership development program.

Check out the companion interview and past episodes of Innovating Leadership, Co-creating Our Future, via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible,  iHeartRADIO, and NPR One.  Stay up-to-date on new shows airing by following the Innovative Leadership Institute LinkedIn.

Mike Sayre – Leading with Purpose

In our ongoing series of blog posts about Inspirational Leaders, this post features Mike Sayre talking to a Capital University MBA class. Mike’s sense of vision and professional integrity has long provided a role model for many in the community. He is a regular speaker in my MBA class sharing his experiences with these emerging executives. Following is an excerpt from his inspirational presentation in his own words:

I only have one major point to make tonight…if you want people to follow your lead in and out of turbulent times, you need to lead consistently and decisively no matter what your business or the economy throws at you, and that all starts with tying why you work to why you live and your own personal purpose in life.

In March of 2006, I was asked to step up from my CFO role and take a bigger role in the company as its CEO, working arm and arm with the founder and chairman to develop and implement a new strategy for profitable growth. This was my first CEO job. And for all of my 25+ years of leadership experience starting and growing companies, I was not totally prepared for my new role! Somebody else had always been the CEO! Well, I learned an awful lot over those four years, in and out of turbulent times, while we achieved record earnings, expanded our operations into Europe and Asia and built a high performance organization highly acclaimed by some of the largest electronics manufacturing companies in the world!

Why was I unprepared and what did I do to successfully lead the organization in these unprecedented achievements for PDSi? I began to get it when my executive coach back in 2006, told me “You can’t lead others if you can’t lead yourself.” Then he pushed me, kicking and screaming, into writing my deepest feelings, thoughts and beliefs all out.  In several 2-6 hour intervals over a couple of months, I wrote, unfettered by form and content, about why I lived and why I worked…pages and pages, streaming thought processes that no one will ever read. This was for me and no one else and I gained clarity about my personal purpose I never had before.

Weeks after, I was asked about a mission and vision for the company. So I used the clarity that had come from my writings and to develop a simple philosophy card. The card spelled out a mission to improve the lives of our shareholders, customers, associates, suppliers and communities in which we live, a vision to be the best in the business at developing collaborative technology solutions for leading technology companies, and operating guidelines based on the Golden Rule of treating others like we would like to be treated. This process of writing it all out and then organizing and reducing it all down to fit on a small card absolutely aligned my work and my life and gave me a sense of my own personal purpose I never had before.

My basic DNA did not change! However, my level of understanding and passion about why I lived and worked, how we should work together and with others, giving back to the community and the importance of the alignment between my life and my work (a lot less balancing!) became very clear.

That understanding and passion made me ever more fully committed to my life and to my work as part of my life. I immediately empowered myself to prioritize work and family time, events and challenges as time and events in my life without trying to constantly “balance” between my work and my life! Sometimes work gets more time than family and sometimes family gets more time than work…it depends on what’s going on, but I look at it all as my life, not my life and then separately my work.

Another advantage of the card was that I/we could use it as a tool for consistent communications and decision-making. “Treating others like we’d like to be treated” had a way of making very difficult decisions much easier and quicker, taking less of a toll on the rest of my life.

So if you’ve never done it before, set aside meaningful time (ASAP) and fully answer in writing the following questions, without concern for form and content (just write and spend some time on it…):

  • Why do you live? Then keep asking yourself why you gave that answer and continue writing your answers in great detail (a minimum of 5 “whys”) until you get to the real core of your beliefs and motivations.
  • Why do you work? Same process with the minimum 5 “whys.”

Then, if you can’t tie why you are living to why you are working today, figure out how you get those two more in alignment! Give your life and your work more meaning and collapse them into one co-mingled set of priorities and challenges, rather than constantly striving to “balance” between them…be committed to BOTH and prioritize accordingly.

Do you have a personal purpose statement?  Our leadership coaches are available to help you explore your purpose and principles.  This is often the fist step in our leadership coaching process.

To become a more innovative leader, you can begin by taking our free leadership assessments and then enrolling in our online leadership development program.

Check out the companion interview and past episodes of Innovating Leadership, Co-creating Our Future, via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible,  iHeartRADIO, and NPR One.  Stay up-to-date on new shows airing by following the Innovative Leadership Institute LinkedIn.

Prioritizing Business Success Through Organizational Transformation

 

Image001MM:  You know, Belinda, I have been a change management consultant for about 20 years now.  From what I am seeing now, in this time of huge transition both economically and in the philosophy of business, I’m thinking that the most effective way to support companies is to offer a targeted package to help senior leaders deal more effectively with complexity.

Here’s what seems to address the greatest need.

·         Invest in leadership development to enable leaders to change the way they lead in a changing business climate
·         Set the vision for the company in this dynamic business environment
·         Implement the changes necessary to thrive
·         Build resilience in people and the organization to enable them to integrate an ever increasing volume of change

And yet, given the pace most people are trying to maintain, how do they make time to invest in personal and organizational transformation?

BG:  Finding time for everything is an issue for everyone, including me!  We all have the same 24/7 and daily have to prioritize so that we are making decisions to do the important things first.  Remember Covey’s model comparing tasks that are urgent and those that are important?  Too many times the important things get set aside for what is considered urgent, but isn’t really important.

When you think about it, nothing is more important than making sure your organization is aligned for success, and that we as leaders are keeping pace with that transformation.  We can waste a lot of time on things that don’t matter if we neglect the basics for understanding how to change.

MM:  So, Belinda, it is clear that we both face time constraints and we also appreciate the urgency in being proactive about transforming companies and leadership teams.  We are following our own advice in designing offerings to meet business needs in an efficient way to make the greatest impact.

To support leadership teams in running a business along with focusing on good stewardship of people and resources, we have packaged our leadership and transformation services into an offering tailored to client needs that ranges from twelve months to 24 months.  Each one day session is designed to build on prior sessions with practical homework in applying learning to your organization. This year, our blog will focus on a client who has made significant progress in leadership development and strategy, and is now introducing the changes to the broader company using the twelve month offering.  We will join them on their journey with about one post per month that generally mirrors their development so you can see how our method might apply to you.

Photo credit: aforero

To become a more innovative leader, you can begin by taking our free leadership assessments and then enrolling in our online leadership development program.

Check out the companion interview and past episodes of Innovating Leadership, Co-creating Our Future, via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible,  iHeartRADIO, and NPR One.  Stay up-to-date on new shows airing by following the Innovative Leadership Institute LinkedIn.

Transforming a Leader and his Organization Success Story

Achievement award by joshMcConnell cc We recently published an article, Transforming a Leader and his Organization An Approach, a Case Study, and Measurable Results. We explore the transformation approach Metcalf & Associates uses with clients and Bob shares his experiences and successes. We also discuss what we learned and what we would do differently in the future. To provide the perspective of the client, Robert Weisenburger Lipetz, MBA, the CEO, offers his insight throughout the article.

Excerpt from the Article

CEO: I started my first day on the job with a borrowed card table and folding chair, with $20,000 in seed money, no income and no way to get paid. But, it was the right mission at the right time and I was determined to make it work. I introduced two lines of service to the community that we served that directly supported the mission: hospital accreditation and care provider education. Both of these services became big successes, rapidly growing us from zero revenue to a seven figure revenue organization. After a couple of years of feeling like I was constantly trying to hang on to a bucking bull, I was searching for an effective way to put into place a structure that could support continued growth with less pain. Metcalf & Associates was initially hired to coach the CEO. Over the course of their work together, they all came to believe that the scope of the work should expand to include both leadership development coaching and management consulting to facilitate the transformations necessary for the organization to thrive.

Results

CEO: I’m no doubt a more resilient manager with a better ability to think in terms of strategy. I’ve also improved my listening skills and have not only become a better leader, but also a happier person. It is a pleasure to work with someone of my coach’s caliber. While research indicates that 75% of change efforts fail to deliver the business results they expected, this transition delivered more than promised and established the foundation for ongoing success. In addition to the client’s individual changes, the organization experienced some significant success in their transition that are listed in detail in the article. To read the full leadership transformation article.

To become a more innovative leader, you can begin by taking our free leadership assessments and then enrolling in our online leadership development program.

Check out the companion interview and past episodes of Innovating Leadership, Co-creating Our Future, via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible,  iHeartRADIO, and NPR One.  Stay up-to-date on new shows airing by following the Innovative Leadership Institute LinkedIn.

By Maureen Metcalf at Innovative Leadership Institute.

Photo credit: Josh McConnell