Posts

Embed Innovation Systematically Part 3, Reflection Questions – Eric’s Story

Ziglar Success I’m Eric Philippou, and I’m writing this blog as part of my college internship at Metcalf & Associates. Congratulations! We have arrived at the final step in innovative leadership development. In this post, we will cover the second set of reflection questions to strengthen your understanding of embedding innovation systematically into your lifestyle. My answers are in italics for you to use as a reference to further understand the questions.

Embed change

Congratulations! This has been the final post in the innovative leadership development series for college students! Remember, innovative leadership and personal development are lifestyles. Once you have developed one skill/behavior to an ideal capacity, you must continue to focus on more areas to develop in order to strengthen your arsenal of skills as a person. Feel free to revisit my posts, or purchase the Innovative Leadership Workbook for College Students coming out in late 2014. Good luck!

To become a more innovative leader, you can begin by taking our free leadership assessments and then enrolling in our online leadership development program.

Check out the companion interview and past episodes of Innovating Leadership, Co-creating Our Future, via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible,  iHeartRADIO, and NPR One.  Stay up-to-date on new shows airing by following the Innovative Leadership Institute LinkedIn.

Photo credit: www.flickr.com Celestine Chua

Embed Innovation Systematically Reflection Questions Part 2 — Eric’s Story

DaVinci self masteryI’m Eric Philippou, and I’m writing this blog as part of my college internship at Metcalf & Associates. Congratulations! We have arrived at the final step in innovative leadership development. In this post, we will cover reflection questions part 1 to strengthen your understanding of embedding innovation systematically into your lifestyle. My answers are in italics for you to use as a reference to further understand the questions.

Eric's embed change reflection questions

There will only be one more post in the innovative leadership development series for college students! In the next post we will review the second half of the reflection questions.

To become a more innovative leader, you can begin by taking our free leadership assessments and then enrolling in our online leadership development program.

Check out the companion interview and past episodes of Innovating Leadership, Co-creating Our Future, via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible,  iHeartRADIO, and NPR One.  Stay up-to-date on new shows airing by following the Innovative Leadership Institute LinkedIn.

If you are interested in receiving Eric’s ongoing blog series or our other articles by email, please sign up in the box on the right labeled Get Email Updates From Us.

Photo credit: www.flickr.com Celestine Chua

Embed Innovation Systematically – Eric’s Story

Michael Jordan TryI’m Eric Philippou, and I’m writing this blog as part of my college internship at Metcalf & Associates. Congratulations! We have arrived at the final step in innovative leadership development. In this post, we will complete the beginning of a Personal Transformation Log. With this, we will know how to track our actual behaviors toward our goals, measure progress, and compare them to expected behaviors and progress. As always, my responses are in italics, which you can use to strengthen your understanding of the question. The next part of this post will give you a real-world application suggestions.

Eric Transformation Actiity Log

Real World Application: Expect the Unexpected & Fail Fast

While it’s important to focus on what’s in front of you in the present, it’s also important to consider the future. As you make progress on your current goals, and you’re in a good rhythm, take a few moments occasionally to consider what goals you could set in the future. Consider upcoming events, such as job hunting or graduate school programs. What kind of skills and behaviors would you like to develop by then? Another important thing is to take unpredictable events into account.

One thing that is guaranteed is that some completely unexpected and uncontrollable events will happen in your life, and they could greatly impact your short- and long-term goals. Due to this, it may be worth considering strengthening your resilience and problem-solving skills/behaviors when setting goals in the future.

Remember, failure is natural and no one is perfect. View mistakes and failure as an opportunity to learn. After all, the only true failure is failure to try.  Remember to think like a scientist, and use experiments, or constant trial-and-error. We like to use the term “fail fast”, meaning the faster you figure out what does not work, the faster you can figure out what does work.

In the next post, we will answer reflection questions to strengthen your understanding of embedding innovation systematically.  

To become a more innovative leader, you can begin by taking our free leadership assessments and then enrolling in our online leadership development program.

Check out the companion interview and past episodes of Innovating Leadership, Co-creating Our Future, via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible,  iHeartRADIO, and NPR One.  Stay up-to-date on new shows airing by following the Innovative Leadership Institute LinkedIn.

If you are interested in receiving Eric’s ongoing blog series or our other articles by email, please sign up in the box on the right labeled Get Email Updates From Us.

Photo credit: www.flickr.com Celestine Chua

Take Action to Develop as a Leader, Reflection Questions Part 2 – Eric’s Story

I’m Eric Philippou, and I’m writing this blog as part of my college internship at Metcalf & Associates. In this post I will answer the second set of reflection questions involved with prepared to take action. As always, feel free to refer to my personal answers in italics to get a better sense of what we’re asking. I am answering these reflection questions to clarify my thoughts about my plan to overcome barriers and leverage enablers from my prior post.

Eric Taking Action Reflection questions

This marks the end of the Take Action part of the innovative leadership development process. In the next post, we will learn how to embed innovation systematically and maintain the mindset of an innovative leader throughout your life.

To become a more innovative leader, you can begin by taking our free leadership assessments and then enrolling in our online leadership development program.

Check out the companion interview and past episodes of Innovating Leadership, Co-creating Our Future, via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible,  iHeartRADIO, and NPR One.  Stay up-to-date on new shows airing by following the Innovative Leadership Institute LinkedIn.

If you are interested in receiving Eric’s ongoing blog series or our other articles by email, please sign up in the box on the right labeled Get Email Updates From Us.

Take Action to Develop as a Leader, Reflection Questions – Eric’s Story

Overcoming ObstaclesI’m Eric Philippou, and I’m writing this blog as part of my college internship at Metcalf & Associates. In this post we will answer reflection questions so that we are thoroughly prepared to take action. As always, feel free to refer to my personal answers in italics to get a better sense of what we’re asking. I am answering these reflection questions to clarify my thoughts about my plan to overcome barriers and leverage enablers from my prior post.

Eric Take Action Reflection Questions

This post contained the first half of the reflection questions for taking action. In the next post I will complete the reflection questions.

To become a more innovative leader, you can begin by taking our free leadership assessments and then enrolling in our online leadership development program.

Check out the companion interview and past episodes of Innovating Leadership, Co-creating Our Future, via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible,  iHeartRADIO, and NPR One.  Stay up-to-date on new shows airing by following the Innovative Leadership Institute LinkedIn.

If you are interested in receiving Eric’s ongoing blog series or our other articles by email, please sign up in the box on the right labeled Get Email Updates From Us.

photo credit: www.flickr.com Celestine Chua

 

 

Take Action to Develop as a Leader – Eric’s Story

Taking actionI’m Eric Philippou, and I’m writing this blog as part of my college internship at Metcalf & Associates. In this post we will take the next step in the innovative leadership development process: taking action. In this post we will discuss how to start in an effective way and show you how to mitigate any potential barriers.

Start Effectively

First of all, you must believe that you can accomplish your short-term milestones. If you’ve been closely following the previous posts and participating in the exercises, and you’re really serious about chasing your life goals, then you are more than capable of accomplishing these short-term milestones. You may seem a little intimidated and overwhelmed, but that’s what you want. If you’re not exiting your comfort zone then you’re not growing.

Secondly, this process will not only take you out of your comfort zone, but will require some consistent commitment. If you must, do not start out too extreme. Take it slow in the beginning, familiarize yourself with the routine and gradually push yourself to greater limits.

Overcoming Barriers

Most importantly, you’ll need to allow yourself some flexibility in your plan because you will likely face obstacles that may require you to temporarily modify your routine. Below is a worksheet to help you overcome your barriers. Feel free to refer to my answers to see how to answer each space. The goal I’m referring to is how I want to increase my productivity with work.

Barrier Action Planning Worksheet
Category Barrier Impact of Barrier How to Remove or Work Around Support I Need to Remove or Work Around This Barrier
In my thinking I over-analyze small details, which takes me on tangents about unrelated things. It distracts me, taking my focus away from the actual task, I end up thinking about something completely irrelevant Maintain perspective on the overall goal of certain tasks to better understand the functions behind the smaller details, requiring less thought later on. Personal support to hold me accountable each day.
In my behavior I try to multi-task way too much. This impedes my productivity. Focus on one task at a time, do it right the first time, practice “essentialism”. Personal support, casually reminding each other about essentialism.
In our beliefs We depend on third parties to do their part of a task too often. This slows us down because we wait for them to finish. Rely less on external sources’ work and consider doing their part by ourselves. Professional partnership support to find out what we can do without a third party.
In how we do things We multi-task as a group. It impedes productivity. reminding each other about focusing on the tasks at hand fully. Remember that I also need to focus and ask others to do the same.

Real World Application: Create a Barrier Log

Review your responses for the Barrier Action Planning Worksheet and create a spreadsheet document. Label the first column “Barrier”. Move one column to the right, and label the next five columns, from left to right, “Attempt #1”, “Attempt #2”, and so on. In the column labeled “Attempt #1”, write how you plan to overcome the corresponding barrier, perhaps using the response you put for the Barrier Action Planning Worksheet. If you fail on the first attempt, write a new or refined way to overcome that barrier, plus what you did wrong in the previous attempt, in the Attempt #2 section, and continue this process until you eventually overcome the barrier. On the attempt where you finally succeed, highlight that box in green. As new barriers rise, add them to the log; however, after you complete a barrier, it is critical that you keep it on the log and do not delete it.

This barrier log will be very useful because you will be able to track what did and did not work in order to overcome a barrier. You will likely come across barriers that are similar to previous ones, so knowing what worked (and what didn’t work) in advance, making the barrier easy to overcome. As time goes on, and you begin to see a long list of old barriers with green boxes, signifying success, your confidence in overcoming barriers will increase. It may be grueling to keep adding more attempts because you keep failing, but understand the that only true failure is failure to try.

Feel free to include barriers outside of the leadership development process, such as academic, social and even health barriers. Save this document in a cloud storage service for both safety and convenience. Update it on a regular basis. Also, if one of your mentors from the Build Your Team section is an “equal”, or someone in the same situation as you, have that person make a barrier log and share logs with each other online or during meetings.

In the next post, we will answer reflection questions to strengthen our understanding of how we’ll take action.

To become a more innovative leader, you can begin by taking our free leadership assessments and then enrolling in our online leadership development program.

Check out the companion interview and past episodes of Innovating Leadership, Co-creating Our Future, via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible,  iHeartRADIO, and NPR One.  Stay up-to-date on new shows airing by following the Innovative Leadership Institute LinkedIn.

If you are interested in receiving Eric’s ongoing blog series or our other articles by email, please sign up in the box on the right labeled Get Email Updates From Us.

Photo Credit: www.flickr.com Celestine Chua

Build Your Team & Communicate Reflection Questions Reflection Questions Part 2 – Eric’s Story

I’m Eric Philippou, and I’m writing this blog as part of my college internship at Metcalf & Associates. In the last post, I answered a series of reflection questions to strengthen my understanding of the development and communication of my support team. I have broken the reflection questions into two posts this one contains the second half of those questions.

Eric Reflection Questions Part 2 support team

This is the end of the Build Your Team & Communicate step. The next step is the second-to-last step in the innovative leadership development process, and perhaps the most exciting step: taking action!

To become a more innovative leader, you can begin by taking our free leadership assessments and then enrolling in our online leadership development program.

Check out the companion interview and past episodes of Innovating Leadership, Co-creating Our Future, via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible,  iHeartRADIO, and NPR One.  Stay up-to-date on new shows airing by following the Innovative Leadership Institute LinkedIn.

If you are interested in receiving Eric’s ongoing blog series or our other articles by email, please sign up in the box on the right labeled Get Email Updates From Us.

Build Your Team & Communicate Reflection Questions Reflection Questions Part 1 – Eric’s Story

Taking responsibility for lifeI’m Eric Philippou, and I’m writing this blog as part of my college internship at Metcalf & Associates. In the last post, we talked about how to effectively communicate and interact with different members of your support team based on their roles. In this post, we will answer a series of reflection questions to strengthen our understanding of the development and communication of our support teams. I have broken the reflection questions into two posts so the next one will contain the second half of the questions.

Eric Part 1 Communication reflection questions

The next post will focus on reflection questions relating to the culture and systems.

To become a more innovative leader, you can begin by taking our free leadership assessments and then enrolling in our online leadership development program.

Check out the companion interview and past episodes of Innovating Leadership, Co-creating Our Future, via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible,  iHeartRADIO, and NPR One.  Stay up-to-date on new shows airing by following the Innovative Leadership Institute LinkedIn.

If you are interested in receiving Eric’s ongoing blog series or our other articles by email, please sign up in the box on the right labeled Get Email Updates From Us.

Photo credit: www.flickr.com chua

Communication Planning, Asking for Support – Eric’s Story

Goal without plan I’m Eric Philippou, and I’m writing this blog as part of my college internship at Metcalf & Associates. In the last post, we established criteria, determined support team members, and their roles based on our specific development goals. In this post, we will manage our communication, timing, and expectations for different types of support team relationships. We will also discuss how to effectively reach out to potential team members who you don’t already know, and emphasize the value of an internship as a formal mentorship.

Communication Planning

Complete the Communication Planning Worksheet below, using the Support Team Worksheet you completed in the last post.

Communication Worksheet - Eric

Reaching out to Potential Supporters

Carefully read the criteria and do the exercises. In the both the support team and communication planning worksheets, make an extra column on the side for specific people who would be ideal for each goal. Right now it may say “a family member” or “someone in my dorm”, but get more specific. For each type of goal, write down as many specific people you know who would fit that role, even if you do have not introduced yourself to that person yet. Think of family, friends, classmates, people in your dorm and co-workers. If you are looking for mentorship for a professional goal, consider professionals in a related field, or even professors who teach that. If you don’t know many professionals, then consider an internship.

After completing this, prepare to approach these people. If you already know them well, kindly contact them how you normally would; however, if you have not introduced yourself, be a bit more careful. Look for an opportunity where you will run into them, contact them via social media or email, or have a mutual friend introduce each other if possible.

Internships – Ideal Professional Mentorship

If you’re having difficulty finding a professional mentor, an internship is one of the best ways to do this, plus there are countless other benefits that an internship brings. Ideally, you do work for a company that aligns with your professional goals, while receiving feedback and mentorship from someone within the company. Other benefits may include financial rewards, valuable experience, additions to resume, letters of recommendation, networking and so much more. Before you start an internship, communicate your mentorship goals to your superiors/co-workers. Obtaining an internship may seem difficult and competitive, but it doesn’t have to be if you take certain approaches.

While career fairs and job listing websites are a great way to get an internship at a “big name” company, they are the most competitive way. Consider this: for every “big name” company you see at a career fair, there may be a dozen small and local companies in your area that do the same thing. These smaller companies don’t have the time or resources to recruit at a career fair or job website, and many of these companies don’t even realize they need an intern. Do a search of companies in your area that do what you want to do, look on their website for an email address, and don’t be afraid to politely reach out to them. Smaller companies can benefit from your help more, which increases their likelihood to accept you as well as give you more responsibility and hands-on experience, thus you learn more. Another perk is that the owner of the company may have worked at a big name company in the industry for a long time, and is extremely skilled, experienced and connected, which is why they are confident enough to start their own company. In summary, getting in internship in your desired industry is one of the best things you can possibly do while in college. Go get one!

Now you have a great understanding of how to select and communicate with your ideal support team. In the next post, we will answer reflection questions to further refine our understanding of building and communicating with our support team.

To become a more innovative leader, you can begin by taking our free leadership assessments and then enrolling in our online leadership development program.

Check out the companion interview and past episodes of Innovating Leadership, Co-creating Our Future, via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible,  iHeartRADIO, and NPR One.  Stay up-to-date on new shows airing by following the Innovative Leadership Institute LinkedIn.

If you are interested in receiving Eric’s ongoing blog series or our other articles by email, please sign up in the box on the right labeled Get Email Updates From Us.

Photo credit: www.flickr.com Celestine Chua

Build Your Team & Communicate, Part One – Eric’s Story

Everyone teachesI’m Eric Philippou, and I’m writing this blog as part of my college internship at Metcalf & Associates. In this step, you will create a strong support group to provide insight and feedback as you pursue short-term and/or long-term goals. In this post (part of the overall step), we will review selection criteria for your support team and do a worksheet to help connect goals with potential support team members.

Support Team Selection Criteria

 When establishing selection criteria, consider that each goal may call for a different type of team member. You might use someone with lots of experience as a mentorship, or you might use someone with equal experience with whom you work together in a partnership role. Before getting into specific criteria, it is important to keep in mind that some seemingly great candidates are people who always tell you what you want to hear, and are afraid to offer constructive criticism because they think they might offend you somehow. Either avoid choosing them, or, if possible, tell them that you will need constructive criticism to grow, and that you will not be offended if they communicate feedback/criticism in a respectful way. Also consider this list of factors as a starting point to developing your support team:

  • Performance: Consider selecting people who have mastery in concepts, skills or behaviors that you would like to develop. These people may have expertise in your field or a field you would like to explore. On the other hand, these people may have strong internal abilities (EQ/resilience, motivation, etc.) or external abilities (“hard skills” such as health, fitness, productivity, time management skills, etc.). They may also be just overall good, caring and respected people.
  • Friends, Family and Roommates: People very close to you in your personal life are effective candidates because they already know about you and your past, and you have a firmly established sense of trust. You may see them on a fairly regular basis, so communication would not be an issue. They might also help you balance your goal with other commitments, such as academic, professional and family commitments, since they might already have an understanding of these aspects of your life.
  • Professors, Advisors, Consultants or Therapists: These people are independent experts in the processes of development and providing helpful feedback. They lack natural biases that some friends, family and roommates may have. These people exist in any personal and professional field that you can imagine.
  • Willingness and Ability to Commit Time to Your Development: It’s critical to understand the mutual needs of you and your support team members. Consider how a candidate can benefit from helping you and to make time for them to provide the feedback you desire. Prepare to be flexible when making plans with support team candidates. Consider volunteering in an organization that your candidate is in to establish the mutual benefit, or helping them with some task in order to expedite its completion, giving them time to provide the feedback you desire. A good example of this is an internship – you help an experienced professional with some work, and in return you get feedback and knowledge.

Support Team Worksheet

Considering the factors listed above, and your plans and goals from the previous innovative leadership steps, replicate the Support Team Worksheet in Microsoft Excel or Google Spreadsheet, and then fill in your answers. Save it on a cloud storage program for more convenience. My answers are in italics.

Eric Support Worksheet

Now you have an idea of what type of support you need based on your goals, and criteria to help you select the ideal support team. The next part in the Build Your Team & Communicate process is the communication part. Communication is vital to effective leadership. In the next post, you’ll learn how to effectively communicate with each support team member, no matter how diverse your support team is.

To become a more innovative leader, you can begin by taking our free leadership assessments and then enrolling in our online leadership development program.

Check out the companion interview and past episodes of Innovating Leadership, Co-creating Our Future, via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible,  iHeartRADIO, and NPR One.  Stay up-to-date on new shows airing by following the Innovative Leadership Institute LinkedIn.

If you are interested in receiving Eric’s ongoing blog series or our other articles by email, please sign up in the box on the right labeled Get Email Updates From Us.

Photo credit: www.flickr.com Celestine Chua